Xxx chat egypt

'I'll.- following are the principal arguments adduced by the press against the use of the vernacular a- the language of Firstly, there is the religious question.

The ver- oded, differs widely from the Is ol the Koran, and the religion of [slam would suffer if the pre* age, which i- practically identical with that in which the Koran i- written, were - ppreased by tin- vej not mj wish at to di cuss this question at length, and i' will he sufficient to to mind, firstly, that the literary • of the day.

This latter reproduces the pronunciation of the Cairene dialect with all the accuracy needed by the practical student. A complete alphabetical list of the words used in the Exercises on the Accidence has been inserted, and an Appendix containing a few additional grammatical notes ; and the work has been gene- rally revised.

It sets before us a Semitic language as it really exists, not an artificial jargon such ae been imagined by grammarians of the old school or the compilers of newspaper articles. A Key to the Exercises, including the Stories, has been published separately.

1 only have 1 submitted the spelling of these words to a oa1 and often to more than one native, but in many cases 1 have found the words written as 1 have given them by persons w education is only such as to enable them to write phonetically, or by kdtibe reporting the exact pronunciation of the speaker.

following, for instance, I have recently noticed: nidauwar, za'bf) lamda, darb (quarter, district), ■■ be accepted in view of the numerous exceptions, and instai Idlya, zarbtya, and qadlya as not admitting of a plural in I do not think the exceptions are numerous. ' 330, Remark d., that rakhar alvi with the subject of the - I &c.

although it- grammar i--, nominal] that, of the Koran, diffei tonsiderabl) fi al both hi i' ' in and its phraseoli - lly, tie which appeared in • ' xiv PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION that the religion of Islam is professed in Turkey, Persia, India, China, and a great many other countries where Arabic is neither spoken nor written ; and, thirdly, that it must be more in the interest of religious education, as of all other education, that the whole of the population should be able to read and write some form of Arabic than that a few persons only should have that privilege. Most Eastern nations cripple their energies by having two distinct languages, one for writing and the other for con- versation.

Much stress is laid on the advantage of having one written language for the whole of the Arab world.

It has been my object t base it on that of the Quraish. et il en n-sulte que ce que nous appelons I'arabe vulgaire est egalemeut on dialects fori ancien;" and Renan (Histoire des Langues SSmitiques) : "L'arabe vulgaire ■ bien plus rapproche' que I'arabe litteral de 111' breu r\ - ; ri U • : ._:. that dialects are every where corruptions of the literary langv . Dialects axial vious to the formation of Literary Langua Language is bul one out of iuan\ dialects ; nor d ill follow that, after one of them ha- been raised to the dignity Literary Language, the others Bhould suddenly he silenced or . "i i 'hancerj Arabic, follows the Hebrew in senting tie- Koranic i/i and •/// by sibilants, thus II ', w hile Aramaic V i represent them Lnvariabl] bj t and d ■ PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION ut strangled. Moreover, it is not exact to say that a final doubled consonant is pronounced in precisely the same way as a single one (see § 24, Remark b).- 1 observe . I thought you must have gone mad when you put your foot in the fire. As these verbs are few in number, and present various irregularities, it will be convenient to give a list of them, with the forms commonly in use. — "Much the best book on the subject that has so far appeared . What has been termed anti- quarian philology is doubtless important to the historian or the literary scholar; for linguistic science it is of little use. the system of transliteration adopted is excellent, simple, yet adequate." BY THE SAME AUTHOR HANDBOOK OF SPOKEN EGYPTIAN ARABIC COMPRISING A SHORT GBAMMAK AND AN ENGLISH-ARABIC VOCABULARY OF CURRENT WORDS AND EXPRESS! For consists of sounds, not of written symbols, and its grammar is that of ordinal}- conversation. On the practical side it will 1).- welcomed by those who live in Egypt and wish to understand and be understood by the natives. The present volume contains an exhaustive account of the Oairene dialect of Egyptian Arabic as it is spoken to-day. THE SPOKEN ARABIC OF EGYPT GRAMMAR, EXERCISES, VOCABULARIES BY J. It tells him what he wants to know — how a living Semitic lane pronounce.- it- words and forms it.- grammar. ONE OF THE JUDGES u F THE NATIVE COOT APPEAL AT CATRO SECOND REVISED AND ENLARGED EDITION o|«-l 0% LONDON DAVID NUTT, 57-59 LONG ACRE 1905 ■ Pnm INTRODUCTION Professor Sheldon Amos once remarked to me that Egyptian Arabic had been a hopeless puzzle to him, which he d of ever being able to master, until he fell across Spitta I grammar of the language. Spitta's work was indeed a model of the way in which a sp living language should be scientifically studied. It opened the way which others should follow and complete. But it will be quil much welcomed by the student of scientific philology. isi\i kmi v Or TORONTO PR] SS &I THE SPOKEN ARABIC OF EGYPT A KEY TO THE EXERCISES IX THE SPOKEN ARABIC OF EGYPT By J. What this modification shall be will depend on the immediate object in view. For this we must have recourse to some modification of the Latin alphabet. Several native gentlemen of high ling have assured me that they desire the change One 90 far as to Baj thai all thinking men are in favour of it; another considers that the project would find more partisanc if it had not be i I by foreigners; the idea has been several times advanced and advocated by dative writers in the Muqtafqf the year 1881. J It is, 1 think, for the lower ther in opinion, as they are the inter It i- not for a small number of persons who already i means of communicating their thoughts in writu decide that tie- rest of the population shall have no means of bo doing.

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